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Tobacco Use

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1 Tobacco Use on Mon May 31, 2010 11:21 pm

Copied from the Texas Civilian Yahoo list. Posted October 2007 by Annette Bethke

I think a discussion of period tobacco use would be appropriate. I know Vicki did research for woman and the use of tobacco, but what do we know about tobacco use in general. Were there cigarettes? Is there a modern version that replicates the look of the period cigarettes? Are pipes and cigars the only alternatives? Was chew available in tins or bags? Are there a resources that can be recommended for research?

Copied from the Texas Civilian Yahoo list. Posted October 2007 by Vicki Betts

http://www.uttyler.edu/vbetts/snuff.htm
"The “Social Dip”: Tobacco Use by Mid-19th Century Southern Women" Originally appeared in The Citizens' Companion, vol. 5, no. 3 (August-September 1993): 12-20.

Copied from the Texas Civilian Yahoo list. Posted October 2007 by Jim Bosworth

Mmmmmmmm, nasal snuff. Beastly stuff, but it is a great alternative to modern decongestive nasal inhalers. And there is a rather pleasant after effect . . . once you finish sneezing. And Wilsons' Snuff can be ordered very inexpensivly. Avoid the modern menthols and go for the traditional blends.


Copied from the Texas Civilian Yahoo list. Posted October 2007 by Terre Schill

Vicki's article (which is great, BTW) is mainly aimed at women, but I am wondering did men or women ever actually "snuff" snuff? i.e. take it nasally? Or was that considered an affectation?

I have already got me two pipes, corncob an' white clay, but am looking for jes' the right species o' twig.

Copied from the Texas Civilian Yahoo list. Posted October 2007 by Jim Bosworth

I can not speak about women but men had been taking snuff since before the American Revolution. It tended to be a tad bit more of an upper class thing because it required a bit more processing than "chaw". Because of this it might explain why powdered snuff was more popular with higher class women than "chaw" was.

Copied from the Texas Civilian Yahoo list. Posted October 2007 by Jim Bosworth

I have not heard of men dipping powdered snuff, only inhaling it. And I have not heard of women inhaling it. But I should probably go check my material on Lola Montez or Lotta Crabtree. They both scandalously smoked maduro cigars, so who knows? Both my wife's and one of my own great grandmothers were in the habit of selecting a special twig of a sweet variety of wood, chewing it into a frazzled end, rolling it around in the container of snuff and then putting the end in their mouth between the cheek and gum. They both had special containers to spit in. Interesting subject.

Copied from the Texas Civilian Yahoo list. Posted October 2007 by Vicki Betts

I keep an ongoing notebook on tobacco, so if you find any references to men "snuffing" snuff post-1840, I'd love to add them to the file. I'm particularly interested in references to cigarettes. They are out there, but very limited.

Copied from Texas Civilian Yahoo list. Posted October 2007 by Annette Bethke

I found an article on the Authentic Campaigner that talks about
cigarette use during the Civil War.

http://www.authentic-campaigner.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1087

Copied from Texas Civilian Yahoo list. Posted October 2007 by Karen Verschoor

Hmmmm...that's weird. In one of the diaries I read it seemed cigarette smoking was very popular with both the confederate and federal troops. The author of the diary (a young woman) claimed to be rather proficient at rolling cigarettes. First as a favor to the confederate troops and then as a way to earn some money by selling them to the occupying federal troops. If you are interested I will try and find the diary. It is posted on the UNC site, documenting the American South.

View user profile http://www.txcwcivilian.org

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